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24th International Conference on Herbal and Alternative Therapies for Diabetes , will be organized around the theme “Emerging the Power of Alternative therapies for Diabetes”

Herbal Diabetes 2018 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Herbal Diabetes 2018

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Many common herbs and spices are claimed to have blood sugar lowering properties that make them useful for people with or at high risk of type 2 diabetes. A number of clinical studies have been carried out in recent years that show potential links between herbal therapies and improved blood glucose control, which has led to an increase in people with diabetes using these more 'natural' ingredients to help manage their condition.

Ayurvedic medicine for diabetes is based upon the built of the patient as sthoola pramehi (obese patient) or krisha pramehi (lean patient) based upon the dosha predominance.
Purificatory therapies like panchakarma are performed as the first stage of treatment in an obese patient and then rejuvenating herbs and formulations are prescribed. Whereas in cases of a lean patient with prameha, nourishing therapies are done in the first stage of Ayurvedic treatment for diabetes.

TCM is a system of healing that originated thousands of years ago. It has evolved into a well-developed, coherent system of medicine that uses several modalities to treat and prevent illness. The most commonly employed therapeutic methods in TCM include acupuncture/moxibustion, Chinese herbal medicine, diet therapy, mind/body exercises (Qigong and Tai Chi), and Tui Na (Chinese massage). Unlike Western medicine, TCM is not concerned with measuring and monitoring blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. Treatment is individualized and geared toward assessing and treating the symptoms that compose patterns of deficiency and disharmony.

Diabetes Mellitus (Zayabetus) is one of the most important lifestyle related disorders that is mostly widespread in urban areas. Diabetes (Zayabetus) is characterized by Excessive thrust, Excessive urination, Excessive increase of appetite, and collapse of sexual function. The disease is associated with Polydypsia (Atash-e-Mufrit) and Polyuria (Kasrat –e-Baul). In case of Diabetes (Zayabetus), level of sugar in blood increases due to lesser production of Insulin through Pancreas.

Several botanical and herbal supplements have been studied as alternative treatments for type 2 diabetes, including ginseng, cinnamon, and aloe vera. Find out if they really work. Currently, there is a paucity of consistent and reproducible efficacy data in humans to suggest any recommendations for most botanical or bioactive supplements as adjunct treatments for risk factors related to metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes.

The acupuncture techniques recommended to treat type 1 and 2 diabetes vary dramatically, just as the treatments of Western medicine differ. These are two different diseases within the diabetes spectrum. Methods are prescribed according to which diabetes symptoms you wish to treat. There are acupuncture techniques to help with weight loss, metabolism, organ function, and nerve pain. One of the more vigorously studied acupuncture techniques that addresses diabetic neuropathy is the wrist-ankle treatment. The treatment involves deep stimulation of the wrist and ankle nerves.

The physiological basis of this belief has never been fully described, but as current research continues to reveal the intricacies of neuro-endocrine pathways, meditation, yoga, and other mind-body therapies are considered to be promising options in the treatment of diabetes.

The prevalence of diabetes is increasing dramatically worldwide.1 Negative effects of physiological and emotional stress on blood glucose control have been described in the literature.2,3 Mind-body therapies, such as meditation, yoga, qi-gong, and other relaxation techniques, have been studied in diabetes as a means of decreasing stress-related hyperglycemia.

For those living with diabetes, aromatherapy or the use of essential oils can directly improve quality of life and help relieve their symptoms. Aromatherapy has often been relegated to the same category of medicine as crystal healing and reiki massage. “New Age” stores with chime music playing and incense burning in all four corners always seem to feature a display of essential oils by the cash register. However even though some vendors may make claims of essential oils that they can’t follow through on, medical research has proven that some oils can have genuine therapeutic value, both in terms of relieving stress and lowering blood pressure through aromatherapy, and also via physical means such as wound care and improving circulation.

Some people living with diabetes use complementary or alternative therapies to treat or manage their diabetes. Some of these therapies may be effective and others can be ineffective or even harmful. Patients who decide to use complementary and alternative medicine should seek advice from their health care providers first.

Insulin therapy is recommended for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an initial A1C level greater than 9 percent, or if diabetes is uncontrolled despite optimal oral glycemic therapy. Insulin therapy may be initiated as augmentation, starting at 0.3 unit per kg, or as replacement, starting at 0.6 to 1.0 unit per kg. When using replacement therapy, 50 percent of the total daily insulin dose is given as basal, and 50 percent as bolus, divided up before breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Augmentation therapy can include basal or bolus insulin. Replacement therapy includes basal-bolus insulin and correction or premixed insulin.

There are many types of non-insulin therapies, which work in different ways, to help manage your type 2 diabetes. Below you will find the most common types such as Metformin, Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), Sulfonylureas, SGLT-2 inhibitors, DPP-4 inhibitors (gliptins), GLP-1. Each type of these therapies work in different ways, and will be suitable for different people, to help best manage type 2 diabetes.

The diagnosis of type 2 diabetes is often delayed, and 20% to 50% of people with type 2 diabetes present with microvascular and/or macrovascular complications at the time of diagnosis (2,3). When lifestyle interventions fail to control blood glucose (BG) levels adequately, pharmacological treatment becomes necessary.

Ozone is a gas, and can be used as a treatment for ulcers in people with diabetes, which can be delivered with ozonised oils (e.g. ozonised sunflower or olive oil), or by a mixture of oxygen and ozone applied directly to the wound, or through rectal insufflation (blown into the final portion of the gut/intestines through the anus).

There is an alarming increase in the number of cases of diabetes with the global prevalence rate at 9% for the year 2014. Around 387 million patients worldwide are suffering from diabetes, and this number is expected to increase by 50% by 2030. In particular, the South East Asian countries are affected most due to diabetes with projected 10% increase in diabetic patients by 2035. Studies over the past several years highlight that cell-based therapies involving adult stem and progenitor cells hold promise of rescuing the dying endothelium in diabetes. This novel therapeutic strategy involves stem cells obtained from a variety of sources, such as circulating endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells, and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).Studies over the past several years highlight that cell-based therapies involving adult stem and progenitor cells hold promise of rescuing the dying endothelium in diabetes. This novel therapeutic strategy involves stem cells obtained from a variety of sources, such as circulating endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells, and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs.

The Indian and Chinese cultures have had several thousand years of history and experience in the prevention and treatment of T2DM with herbal medicine. As later discussed, several herbal medications have been proven to be clinically effective. Because herbal medicines are usually derived from natural plants, they are considered to be relatively safe and have fewer side effects compared to the conventional drugs.

Nutrition therapy has its greatest impact when a person is first diagnosed with diabetes. A variety of nutrition therapy interventions can help with diabetes management, including carbohydrate counting, simplified meal plans, healthy food choices, individualized meal planning strategies, exchange lists and behavior strategies.

In women with type 2 diabetes, the changes in sex-hormone levels, abdominal fat, and insulin metabolism that accompany menopause may represent additional impediments in achieving good glycaemic control. There is evidence that exogenous estrogens might reduce some of these adverse changes.

The microvascular complications of insufficiently controlled diabetes (neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy) and the marked increased risk of macrovascular events (e.g., stroke and myocardial infarction) have a dire impact on society in both human and economic terms. In Type 1 diabetes total β-cell loss occurs. In Type 2 diabetes, partial β-cell loss occurs before diagnosis, and the progressive β-cell loss during the life of the patient increases the severity of the disease. In patients with diabetes, increased insulin resistance in the muscle and liver are key pathophysiologic defects. In addition, defects in metabolic processes in the fat, GI tract, brain, pancreatic α-cells and kidney are detrimental to the overall health of the patient. This review addresses novel therapies for these deficiencies in clinical and preclinical evaluation, emphasizing their potential to address glucose homeostasis, β-cell mass and function, and the comorbidities of cardiovascular disease and obesity.

Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into the energy necessary for daily life. While the cause of diabetes is unknown, factors such as obesity and lack of exercise play important roles. Diabetes can result in conditions such as: heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease, nervous system disease (neuropathy), amputations, and problems with the skin, including ulcers and infections.

Aceruloplasminemia is a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the ceruloplasmin gene that result in loss of protein ferroxidase activity. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in iron homeostasis, and its activity impairment leads to iron accumulation in liver, pancreas, and brain. Iron deposition promotes diabetes, retinal degeneration, and progressive neurodegeneration.

Diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, and acute adrenal crisis are life-threatening endocrine emergencies that have marked effects on fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base homeostasis. Rapid identification of these disorders and aggressive therapy to correct fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base imbalances are crucial to a successful outcome for the patient.

In T1D, islets are the target for autoreactive T cell destruction. The absence of islets leads to insulin deficiencies and resultant hyperglycemia. Gene therapy is a useful technique to treat T1D as it can be applied from many different angles. The insulin gene can be replaced in a host or the autoreactive T cells suppressed.